NASA Scrubs has planned to launch the Artemis I mission to the Moon due to an engine problem

NASA Scrubs has planned to launch the Artemis I mission to the Moon due to an engine problem

NASA Scrubs has planned to launch the Artemis I mission to the Moon due to an engine problem

In this image provided by NASA, NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket with the Orion spacecraft on board is seen atop a mobile launcher at Launch Pad 39B as launch preparations continue at NASA's Kennedy Space Center on 28. August 2022 in Cape Canaveral, Florida.  NASA's Artemis I flight test is the first integrated test of the agency's deep space exploration systems: the Orion spacecraft, the SLS rocket, and ground support systems.  The unmanned flight test launch is expected no earlier than August 29 at 8:33 am ET.

In this image provided by NASA, NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket with the Orion spacecraft on board is seen atop a mobile launcher at Launch Pad 39B as launch preparations continue at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center on 28. August 2022 in Cape Canaveral, Florida. NASA’s Artemis I flight test is the first integrated test of the agency’s deep space exploration systems: the Orion spacecraft, the SLS rocket, and ground support systems. The unmanned flight test launch is expected no earlier than August 29 at 8:33 am ET.

Joel Kowsky / NASA via Getty

NASA’s latest space mission will have to wait another day.

The agency’s launch director halted the planned launch of the Artemis I rocket – the most powerful rocket the space agency has ever built – at 8:34 am Eastern time on Monday, citing an unsuccessful bleeding test in a press release. released shortly before 9:00 am

“The Space Launch System rocket and the Orion spacecraft remain in a safe and stable configuration,” read the NASA press release. “Launch controllers were continuing to investigate why a bleed test to bring the RS-25 engines at the bottom of the center stage to the correct temperature range for takeoff was unsuccessful and ran out of time in the launch window. two hours. Engineers are continuing to collect more data. “

According to CNN, one of the rocket’s four engines had a problem with an engine bleed before the launch was postponed.

“We don’t launch until it’s right,” NASA administrator Bill Nelson said in a shared live stream The NASA Twitter page Monday. “It’s just illustrative that this is a very complicated machine, a very complicated system and all of these things have to work. You don’t want to light the candle until it’s ready for use.”

RELATED: All about NASA’s Artemis I mission

Nelson, 79, cited his own experience with launch postponements when he traveled into space on the spacecraft. Colombia in 1986 during his time as a member of Congress as an example of how last-minute scrubs can lead to successful missions.

“We rubbed the pad four times and the fifth attempt was a flawless mission,” said Nelson. “We know that if we launched one of those scrubs it wouldn’t be a good day.”

Nelson said on Monday’s live stream that Vice President Kamala Harris, who chairs the National Space Council, was fully briefed on the situation as he visited Florida for the planned launch.

“She is very happy to be here. She is an enthusiastic advocate of space, as is President Biden,” Nelson said. This whole thing will make our country proud “.

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Although the next Artemis I launch availability will be on Friday, Nelson said it’s unclear if that time frame will be used for a new attempt. Meanwhile, engineers continue to collect data, according to NASA.

If the rocket is launched during Friday’s two-hour window, its mission will last 42 days and return on October 11, according to CNN. If not, the next launch window is scheduled for 90 minutes on Monday, September 5th, which would result in a return on October 17th.

NASA's Artemis 1 rocket is ready for launch on Pad 39-B at Kennedy Space Center on August 27, 2022 in Cape Canaveral, Florida.  The rocket is in preparation for an unmanned flight around the moon on August 29, 2022.

NASA’s Artemis 1 rocket is ready for launch on Pad 39-B at Kennedy Space Center on August 27, 2022 in Cape Canaveral, Florida. The rocket is in preparation for an unmanned flight around the moon on August 29, 2022.

Paul Hennessy / Anadolu agency via Getty

Titled Space Launch System, the vehicle is the most powerful rocket the space agency has ever built. The next Artemis mission will represent its first launch since NASA began its development in 2011.

But this isn’t the only vehicle to come out of this world at the end of this month. The Orion, a partially reusable manned spacecraft, will accompany the unmanned SLS rocket on the monumental journey.

While the rocket will whiz 280,000 miles from Earth and thousands of miles beyond the moon over the course of about three weeks, the Orion will stay in space for a duration “longer than any astronaut ship without docking at a space station and returning home. faster and hotter than ever, “according to NASA.

RELATED: NASA Offers to Fly Your Name Around the Moon in the Next Artemis I Mission

The purpose of the Artemis mission is to pave the way for a long-term sustainable lunar presence, while also serving as a base for eventually sending astronauts to Mars, in addition to the moon. The Artemis I mission is the first in NASA’s series of “increasingly complex” journeys in space and around the moon. The flight test will be unmanned and will serve as a stepping stone for future human space exploration.

Furthermore, the mission strives to “prove [NASA’s] commitment and ability to extend human existence to the moon and beyond, “according to the space agency.

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