NASA again postpones the Artemis I mission due to the hours of fuel leakage before the scheduled launch

NASA again postpones the Artemis I mission due to the hours of fuel leakage before the scheduled launch

NASA again postpones the Artemis I mission due to the hours of fuel leakage before the scheduled launch

A full moon is in sight from Launch Complex 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida on June 14, 2022. The Artemis I Space Launch System (SLS) and the Orion spacecraft, atop the mobile launcher, are in preparation for a general practice test times and procedures for the launch.  The first in an increasingly complex series of missions, Artemis I will test SLS and Orion as an integrated system before manned flights to the Moon.  Through Artemis, NASA will land the first woman and first black person on the lunar surface, paving the way for a long-term lunar presence and using the Moon as a stepping stone on the way to Mars.

A full moon is in sight from Launch Complex 39B at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on June 14, 2022. The Artemis I Space Launch System (SLS) and the Orion spacecraft, atop the mobile launcher, are in preparation for a general practice test times and procedures for the launch. The first in an increasingly complex series of missions, Artemis I will test SLS and Orion as an integrated system before manned flights to the Moon. Through Artemis, NASA will land the first woman and first black person on the lunar surface, paving the way for a long-term lunar presence and using the Moon as a stepping stone on the way to Mars.

Ben Smegelsky / NASA

Artemis I is on the ground once again.

NASA postponed its mission to the moon Saturday due to a fuel leak hours before the scheduled launch at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida, after the original launch was canceled earlier this week due to engine problems.

“During the tanking of the #Artemis I mission, a leak developed on the power side of the 8-inch quick disconnect while trying to transfer fuel to the rocket,” NASA announced on Twitter. “Attempts to solve it so far have not been successful.”

RELATED: NASA Scrubs Scheduled Launch for Artemis I Mission to the Moon Due to Engine Problems

They have provided another update an hour later: “The #Artemis I mission to the moon has been postponed. The teams attempted to resolve an issue related to a leak in the hardware transferring fuel to the rocket, but were unsuccessful. Join NASA leaders more late today for a press conference. “

At the heart of the Artemis I mission are the Orion, NASA’s reusable spacecraft, and the agency’s Space Launch System (SLS), the first rocket in half a century designed to fly astronauts to the moon.

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According to NASA, the Orion and SLS will fly 280,000 miles from Earth and thousands of miles beyond the moon during a six-week journey.

Once the Orion reaches the moon, the spacecraft will remain in orbit for about six days to collect data and allow mission controllers to test the spacecraft’s performance. It will then establish a return path to Earth.

During this time, the spacecraft will have stayed in space “longer than any astronaut ship did without docking at a space station and returning home faster and warmer than ever,” NASA said on its website. .

In this image provided by NASA, NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) rocket with the Orion spacecraft on board is seen atop a mobile launcher at Launch Pad 39B as launch preparations continue at NASA's Kennedy Space Center on 28. August 2022 in Cape Canaveral, Florida.  NASA's Artemis I flight test is the first integrated test of the agency's deep space exploration systems: the Orion spacecraft, the SLS rocket, and ground support systems.  The unmanned flight test launch is expected no earlier than August 29 at 8:33 am ET.

In this image provided by NASA, NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) rocket with the Orion spacecraft on board is seen atop a mobile launcher at Launch Pad 39B as launch preparations continue at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center on 28. August 2022 in Cape Canaveral, Florida. NASA’s Artemis I flight test is the first integrated test of the agency’s deep space exploration systems: the Orion spacecraft, the SLS rocket, and ground support systems. The unmanned flight test launch is expected no earlier than August 29 at 8:33 am ET.

Joel Kowsky / NASA via Getty

Artemis 1 is the first in a series of missions planned by NASA in the coming years to expand “human existence on the moon and beyond,” according to the space agency.

The Artemis mission takes its name from the Greek goddess of the moon, who is also the twin sister of Apollo, god of the sun and light. Apollo was also the name given to the series of missions that eventually led astronauts Buzz Aldrin, Neil Armstrong and Michael Collins to reach the moon in 1969.

For the second Artemis mission, NASA plans to send astronauts on a different trajectory than the current mission with the goal of testing “Orion’s critical systems with humans aboard,” according to their website.

RELATED VIDEO: Everything about NASA’s Artemis I mission, including how to watch a mega rocket launch to the moon

In future missions, NASA plans to land the first woman and first black person on the moon, which could happen as early as 2025, according to National Geographic. These missions would have been the first time NASA had sent humans to the moon from Apollo 17 in December 1972.

The goal of the Artemis missions is to create a long-term sustainable lunar presence, also serving as a base to eventually send astronauts to Mars, in addition to the moon.

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