An expert guide to energy-saving kitchen appliances

An expert guide to energy-saving kitchen appliances

An expert guide to energy-saving kitchen appliances

The knowledge manager at Energy Saving Trust shares his insight (The Independent)

The knowledge manager at Energy Saving Trust shares his insight (The Independent)

Against the backdrop of higher inflation rates of the past 40 years and a cost-of-living crisis, British households face a surge in energy prices. The maximum price, set by the regulator Ofgem, will increase by 80% from October.

This will see the average household’s annual energy bill increase to £ 3,549 from £ 1,971. While those on prepay, who are often the most vulnerable households, will be even more affected, with bills soaring to £ 3,608. An even steeper upward trajectory is expected for 2023.

With the cost of living rising exponentially, we are all looking for ways to reduce our consumption. Joanna O’Loan, knowledge manager at Energy Saving Trust, a non-profit organization dedicated to energy efficiency and low-carbon solutions, said The independent that “about four percent of the energy bill is spent on powering kitchen appliances”. But research by energy supplier Utilita found you could save £ 604 per year by switching to more energy-efficient appliances, such as an air fryer and microwave.

What is an energy saving appliance? In essence, it is an appliance that will use “the least amount of energy during each use compared to similar appliances,” says O’Loan. For example, an “electric oven is the most energy-consuming way to cook”, while microwaves, for example, “are relatively inexpensive cooking appliances, as they only heat the food, rather than the surrounding air”.

In terms of what you should keep in mind when buying a new appliance, O’Loan notes that energy labels “will tell you how much energy that appliance consumes.” The scale goes from A to G, with A being the most efficient, but not all appliances have this certification.

Therefore, you may want to calculate how much energy your appliances consume, you can do this by “multiplying the rated power of the appliance in kW by the time you leave it on”. For example, “a microwave oven can be rated at 700W and you can run it for three minutes,” so O’Lean notes that you need to multiply 0.7 by three then divide by 60 to find out the consumption, in this case. a 700 W the microwave consumes 0.035 kWh.

When it comes to choosing the most energy efficient kitchen appliances, O’Loan recommends “considering the size of the appliance you need with the highest energy class and this will help you find the most affordable appliance. for you”.

So, with O’Loan’s advice in mind, in addition to searching for Utilities, here we round up the energy-saving appliances you should use in the kitchen, instead of an electric oven.

Microwave

Compared to an electric oven, which is “the most energy-consuming way” of small meals, “microwaves are relatively inexpensive cooking appliances.” Utilita’s research identifies that it costs only 8p per day to operate a microwave, with a potential savings of £ 287 per year.

    (Suction)

(Suction)

If you’re looking for a recommendation, the Hoover HMCI25TB-UK microwave (£ 149, Currys.co.uk) took the top spot in our review of the best microwaves. Thanks to its 900W power rating, it is very economical to use – costs much less than 1p for three minutes – and has been praised for its “wide range of features”. Despite its relatively low price, it was noted as having “the latest inverter technology, good capacity and a decent oven”.

    (Wise)

(Wise)

For something that does it all, opt for Sage’s 3-in-1 wave combi (£ 399.95, Johnlewis.com), which is a “convection oven, powerful microwave and air fryer in one”. Using “inverter technology to automatically adjust power intensity for smoother cooking results, especially noticeable on delicate and heated foods”, this is a high performance appliance and our tester founder is a “dream to use straight away. from the box”.

Thanks to the fact that it has a power of 1,100 W, it will consume 0.055 kWh, which is obviously a little more energy than your average model, but it is a great alternative to an oven.

Air fryer

Probably one of the most talked about kitchen appliances recently: the humble air fryer. These ingenious devices can do just about everything from crispy fries and casseroles to chicken to rotisserie and even baked goods.

Better yet, they use far less energy than an oven, with O’Loan noting that an air fryer rated at 1,700W running for 15 minutes will only consume 0.425 kWh of energy. Thankfully, many models are often old enough to cook enough food to feed a family as well.

    (Ninja)

(Ninja)

Not sure which one to choose? The Ninja foodi dual zone air fryer (£ 179, Currys.co.uk) took the top spot in our review of the best air fryers with our tester calling it a “game changer in the kitchen” because ” it comes with two independent cooking zones, so you can cook two foods, in two ways, at the same time “.

“The roast, bake, dehydrate and reheat settings mean it can replace the oven to cook almost anything, including leftover pizza, vegetable fries and roast meat – in ours we made a deliciously moist salmon fillet and roast potatoes,” he said. observed our tester.

For something that has more capacity, turn to the Tower xpress pro combo 10-in-1 air fryer, which our tester found to be “as good as buying an extra oven” and has all the “bells and whistles” that ‘I will never need.

    (Tower)

(Tower)

“Its large capacity, three shelves and range of cooking functions are even more impressive for the price, and we will never tire of having our own personal rotisserie for melt-in-your-mouth chicken and kebabs.”

Slow cooker

Finally, a slow cooker was found to use a little more energy than a traditional light bulb to operate, with an average model only costing 16p a day to operate, which is five times cheaper than an electric oven that it costs an average of 87 pence a day to run.

The Crockpot Slow Cooker Sizzles and 6.5-liter Stove (£ 36, Argos.co.uk) scored top spot in our guide “thanks to its family-friendly capacity, stove-friendly inner pot and easy cleaning “. With a power of only 270W, it uses less than a tenth of the energy used for some electric ovens, making it more efficient when it comes to cooking delicious dinners.

    (Pot)

(Pot)

The large capacity “meant that meals lasted for the whole family for more than a day and we could even batch cook a huge portion of bolognese or soup to keep us going all week.” “It could even handle a huge pulled pork roast when we had hungry visitors, while the manual keep warm function kept everything at the perfect temperature until we were ready to eat,” added our writer.

If your family doesn’t need something that big, the Morphy Richards Titanium Slow Cooker (£ 49.99, Morphyrichards.co.uk) has a 3.5 liter capacity and has been considered best for small kitchens.

    (Morphy Richards)

(Morphy Richards)

“It takes up very little space together with other pots and looks smart enough even when left out on the countertop”, despite its relatively small size, “it still has a decent capacity and serves four generous main portions, while the oval shape means it is possible. cooking clumsy cuts of meat ”.

Hopefully, this guide has given you some inspiration on how and what to cook for your next meal, and has cleared your mind on how to save some much-needed pennies too.

Looking forways to stay warm? Read our guide on how to stay toasted without turning on the heat

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